Aromar Revi: Co-creation is the only way to move forward



Aromar Revi is a practitioner, consultant, researcher and educator with over a quarter century of inter-disciplinary experience in public policy and governance.

As a story teller, Aromar, takes us through an incredible journey in India – a country with a long history, hundreds of different spoken languages and many diverse, living cultures.

India is a place where the main historical periods of the country can all be found in one building. The culture of pre-colonialism, the colonialism, the post-colonialism and the informal co-exist together in armory. The informal is represented by all the poor people who live aside from the conventional society. But how can be possible that all those layers in India are connected, and how are the Danes linked to Indians?

The answer may sound obvious: We all live on this Earth, sharing the same resources. This fact ties everyone to each other. In the end, physical distances and cultural gaps become less evident when we consider that we have just one world to live in. This is what connects us all, and within this frame, co-creation is the only way to move forward.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

In this video clip, Aromar Revi explains and elaborates on the concept of ‘hope’. He believes that, “Hope is among the strongest values for Indians.”

According to Aromar Revi, hope is a common part of every human being. It is the driver that makes people overcome the daily challenges that life presents.

In India, a lot of people are under 30 years old, and they want to improve their lives. This could have a positive outcome also for the people in the community in which they live. Those young people are able to learn new things and have new experiences. They see that the world is different and diverse, and those experiences give them the strength to see that things can be changed.

Moreover, another value that should be transmitted between generations is the capacity to do more with less, being able to respect the community, work together without being very competitive and respect other people for who and what they are. The Danish people could learn something in this regard.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

In this video clip, Aromar Revi gives us some insight into cycle culture in Denmark and India.

In India, bicycles are mainly used by poor people. Cycling is, for them, the only option available. It is different in Copenhagen where everyone rides a bicycle not because they can’t afford a car, but because it is more practical, faster, healthy, and non-polluting.

Even if the Indian and Danish realities are different, from the weather to the people, Aromar Revi believes that India should change and become similar to Copenhagen in this respect. In fact, having efficient cycle paths and cycle parking facilities would improve Indian lives and reduce the number of daily car accidents. It would save lives and transform the city into a more environmentally friendly place.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

These video clips were recorded by Mik Aidt of the Danish Cultural Institute during the conference ‘Sustainability and Peace: Dialogue and co-creation across cultures’ held at Arken Museum on 13 September 2012 as part of the ‘India Today Copenhagen Tomorrow’ initiative, and the summaries ware written by Inanna Riccardi.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Learn more
See more video clips with interviews, speeches and powerpoint presentations – and read more about the conferences, which are part of the ‘India Today Copenhagen Tomorrow’ initiative, here: www.indiadenmark.in/conferences

Share your thoughts
Take part in the online conversation and exchange of inspiration between India and Denmark on: www.facebook.com/cocreatenow

 

 

Share on Facebook

Latest articles

Popular keywords

agriculture architecture bicycles business city planning climate co-creation corruption crafts creativity Denmark design education fashion film food genetic research Grundtvig happiness heritage India india_denmark innovation interview lifestyle literature management culture media museums music peace performing arts research science and research social responsibility sustainability Søren Kierkegaard technology theatre tourism video visual arts welfare wind power youth